Procrastination Pitstop

Writer (co-Author of Marissa Alwin), Mom, Wife, Dreamer, who every once in a while needs a moment away from it all

amandaonwriting:

Source for Twitter Comic

amandaonwriting:

Source for Twitter Comic

amandaonwriting:

The Importance of Varying Sentence Length
We Shall Keep the Faith
by Moina Michael, November 1918

Oh! you who sleep in Flanders Fields,Sleep sweet - to rise anew!We caught the torch you threwAnd holding high, we keep the FaithWith All who died.
We cherish, too, the poppy redThat grows on fields where valor led;It seems to signal to the skiesThat blood of heroes never dies,But lends a lustre to the redOf the flower that blooms above the deadIn Flanders Fields.
And now the Torch and Poppy RedWe wear in honor of our dead.Fear not that ye have died for naught;We’ll teach the lesson that ye wroughtIn Flanders Fields.
Inspiration for the poem

Having read John McCrae’s poem 'In Flanders Fields' Moina Michael made a personal pledge to ‘keep the faith’. She felt compelled to make a note of this pledge and hastily scribbled down a response entitled “We Shall Keep the Faith” on the back of a used envelope. From that day she vowed to wear a red poppy of Flanders Fields as a sign of remembrance.
Read the fascinating story of Moina Michael and how she had the idea to use the delicate poppy flower to raise funds for ex-servicemen returning from the First World War: http://www.greatwar.co.uk/people/moina-belle-michael.htm

We Shall Keep the Faith

by Moina Michael, November 1918

Moina Michael

Oh! you who sleep in Flanders Fields,
Sleep sweet - to rise anew!
We caught the torch you threw
And holding high, we keep the Faith
With All who died.

We cherish, too, the poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led;
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies,
But lends a lustre to the red
Of the flower that blooms above the dead
In Flanders Fields.

And now the Torch and Poppy Red
We wear in honor of our dead.
Fear not that ye have died for naught;
We’ll teach the lesson that ye wrought
In Flanders Fields.

Inspiration for the poem

Flanders poppies

Having read John McCrae’s poem 'In Flanders Fields' Moina Michael made a personal pledge to ‘keep the faith’. She felt compelled to make a note of this pledge and hastily scribbled down a response entitled “We Shall Keep the Faith” on the back of a used envelope. From that day she vowed to wear a red poppy of Flanders Fields as a sign of remembrance.

Read the fascinating story of Moina Michael and how she had the idea to use the delicate poppy flower to raise funds for ex-servicemen returning from the First World War: http://www.greatwar.co.uk/people/moina-belle-michael.htm

Thank you to all I knew and never met who served and died. Use your voice to make sure everyone is able to share in the rights they died protecting

todaysdocument:

Thirty years ago the Unknown Service Member of the Vietnam Era was interred in the Tomb of the Unknown Solider at Arlington National Cemetery.

Members of the Marine Corps honor guard attend the casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era aboard the USS BREWTON (FF 1086). The frigate is en route and transported to Naval Air Station Alameda, California, at the conclusion of the designation and departure ceremony for the Unknown. Members of the ship’s crew stand at parade rest in the background, 05/17/1984

A joint services casket team places the casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era aboard a C-141B Starlifter aircraft for a flight to Washington, District of Columbia. The Unknown will lie in state in the Capitol building until Memorial Day, when he will be interred at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery, 05/25/1984

The flag-draped casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era, secured in the rear of a C-141B Starlifter aircraft, is ready for the flight to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. Once at Andrews, the Unknown will be taken to the Capitol, where he will lie in state prior to internment at the Tomb of the Unknowns, Arlington National Cemetery, 05/24/1984

A joint services casket team removes the casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era from a hearse parked outside the east entrance of the Capitol. The casket will be carried past the color guard and joint services honor condon lining the steps of the Capitol and placed in the rotunda, where the Unknown will lie in state until Memorial Day, 05/25/1984

A joint services honor guard surrounds the casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era during the arrival ceremony in the Capitol rotunda. President and Mrs. Ronald Reagan, VIPs, Vietnam veterans and other guests are attending the ceremony. The Unknown will lie in state in the rotunda until Memorial Day, 05/25/1984

President Ronald Reagan, center, bows his head as a prayer is said during arrival ceremonies for the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era at the Capitol rotunda. The Unknown will lie in state until Memorial Day when interment will take place at Arlington Cemetery in the Tomb of the Unknowns, 05/25/1984

A 3rd Infantry (The Old Guard) caisson waits on the east plaza of the Capitol during the formation of the funeral procession for the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era. A joint services casket team carries the casket of the Unknown past a joint services honor cordon lining the steps of the Capitol, 05/28/1984

The state funeral procession for the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era arrives at Arlington National Cemetery. The Lincoln Memorial is visible in the background, 05/28/1984

President Reagan Presenting Congressional Medal of Honor to Vietnam Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, 05/28/1984

The casket of the Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Era rests on a bier at the Tomb of the Unknowns at the conclusion of the burial service at Arlington National Cemetery. The Vietnam Unknown will be interred between the Unknowns of the Korean War and World War II, 05/28/1984

Remembering the sacrifices of the known and unknown on Memorial Day.

*DNA testing later identified the remains as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Joseph Blassie, who was shot down near An Loc, Vietnam, in 1972. It has been decided that the crypt that contained the remains of the Vietnam Unknown will remain vacant.

via the Arlington National Cemetery Tomb of the Unknowns

Five stolen Egyptian artefacts located in Europe

archaeologicalnews:

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The antiquities ministry has located five ancient Egyptian artefacts that were smuggled out of the country in 2002, it announced on Saturday.

Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim announced that the artefacts were stolen during illegal excavations at the Saqqara necropolis, 25 kilometres south…

whereartmeetspolitics:

imaginariumgeographica:

harrysflaccidcock:

Someone at my school made these in response to my principal announcing a dress code that, as usual, only applied to girls, and I’m kind of proud

So apparently this is my old high school???

I hope signs like this keep popping up all over the world.

(Source: harrysflaccidnude, via christinedabo)

Spiritual Power? 18th-Century Artifacts Unearthed in Caribbean

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists working on two small Caribbean islands have found artifacts intentionally buried beneath two 18th-century plantation houses.

They appear to have been placed there for their spiritual power, protecting the inhabitants against harm, said John Chenoweth, a professor at the…

amandaonwriting:

Quotable - Søren Kierkegaard, born 5 May 1813, died 11 November 1855
12 Philosophical Quotes 

amandaonwriting:

Quotable - Søren Kierkegaard, born 5 May 1813, died 11 November 1855

12 Philosophical Quotes 

10 Things Successful Authors Do

amandaonwriting:

'Have you ever wondered why some authors succeed and others don’t? Sometimes we spend so much time obsessing over a book, or an idea for a book, that we don’t see the bigger picture. Sometimes, it’s a good idea to take a breath and have a look at our behaviour. There may be things we could be doing differently to improve our writing.'

These are the 10 things I’ve watched successful writers do

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